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Traveller Paper Miniatures Vol. 2 Imperial Marines I
by Kevin S. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/24/2018 22:53:46

very nice set, and the new layout is great, now with the update you can print out what type you want trifold, black boarder, no boarder with all 3 colors, all on one page, can't wait for the updates on all.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Traveller Paper Miniatures Vol. 2 Imperial Marines I
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Paranoia Red Clearance Edition
by Ivan S. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/18/2018 06:57:33

Ran this game after kickstarting it.

It came with a bunch of nice stuff, and it totally had a great way of introducing the GM and the Players to the world. I've now run one of the sample missions three times (the others didn't speak to me in the same way, they're too long and held my hands in ways I didn't get to go) with 3 different groups, including at a Con. The mission I ran involved misdirection and a Black corridor that wasn't.

After the first time, I mostly ditched half of the mechanics, mostly the pretty cards, because I figured they were too complicated for a one-shot. By the end, I found I was using the "Number One Troubleshooter" card, and the weapons card (it wasn't a "combat" scenario) and flying through most of the rest of the game.

I had a blast running it, but I reckon the core of that was the setting, which is available in multiple other locations. The other friends I have who kickstarted it have sold theirs on, in fact, because they disliked the mechanics enough.



Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Paranoia Red Clearance Edition
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Slayer's Guide to Troglodytes
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 03/29/2018 13:20:26

How much do you know about troglodytes? Most people stop after "They live underground"... but if you read this you'll soon know a lot more about what the Introduction describes as 'a thoroughly foul reptilian race' (not a promising start) who dwell in the underdark, and occasionally in the rocky peaks and passes of remote mountains, and are remarkably good at conducting ambushes with javelins. Are they really that bad, or do they have some redeeming features?

We start with Troglodyte Physiology, although there's a lot more here than that. OK, so they are five-foot tall upright bipedal critters with scent glands that turn anyone's stomach, and rarely seen unless they are raiding. Unlike many bipedal creatures with tails, they don't use them as a counterbalance but drag them along the floor behind them, leaving a distinctive track that doesn't take a ranger to follow. Never mind the scent glands, they aren't too good at personal hygiene either. Dentition suggests that they are carnivore, possibly carrion-eaters, but nobody knows for sure. Detailed descriptions of their appearance, mating habits, chameleon-like skins, lifecycle and more follow. They are far weirder than you might have thought!

Next, Habitat is discussed. They invariably live underground, some deeper than others. They are good swimmers although by no means amphibious, and many of their lairs are partially submerged. They also need access to a good food supply - they have virtually insatiable appetities. Moving on from this, Troglodyte Society looks at their organisation, based around tribes of about thirty to an hundred in number, including hatchlings and juveniles. They are very territorial, despite their lairs being nothing to be proud of: dirty and messy are polite descriptions of their normal state. They are always hungry - a well-fed male goes into a mating frenzy that soon means that he's after something to eat again. The more tribe members get to eat, the larger and more intelligent they become - and the more likely to challenge their leaders. There's a distict hierarchy based on age, size and intelligence with only the most advanced (read 'well-nourished') tribes boasting crafters or clerics amongst their number. However smart they are, they all are vile and cruel, even the most stupid youngster has an appetite for torment and cruelty which they indulge whenever they get the chance. After all, even their own leaders regard them as expendable. Those of them bright enough to engage in worship follow an evil deity, the Lizard Toad, about whom the less said the better.

Methods of Warfare are explored next. They're very good at ambushes and skilled with javelins. As aggressive carnivores, it's often unclear whether they distinguish between a battle and a hunt. The vanquished are likely to be eaten either way. They are remarkably organised in battle, moving as one to the attack, although individually they fight almost in a frenzy. They are most ferocious of all when defending their lairs.

Next is a look at Role-playing with Troglodytes. It's all about bringing out the otherness of this race, an alien evilness that just doesn't relate to anything else your party will have ever encountered. It's quite difficult to interact with them in any manner that doesn't involve the point of a sword or a battery of offensive spells. Only the leaders are smart enough to even be able to hold a conversation, and they generally do not wish to do so - rank and file troglodytes are just too dense to have any meaningful communication at all. This section explains how to create troglodyte communities and involve them in the world above their heads, and it is followed by a selection of Scenario Hooks and Ideas to bring them into your game. There are also details on creating crafter troglodyes, but it is highly unlikely that they will ever be more than NPCs.

Finally, The Shrine of St Darius presents a fully-developed troglodyte lair - the troglodytes having accessed a monastery through caverns beneath it that link into the crypt... to the downfall of those religious living there. Although there's plenty of detail about who the troglodytes are and their activities, no plans are provided. It's suggested you site this in a remote mountain valley in your game world and, unless the party is sent there to find out what happened to the clerics living there until recently, use the various scenario hooks provided earlier to slowly bring it into prominence.

You will still feel that troglodytes are disgusting and evil after reading this, but you will know much more about how they come to be so vile, and will be in a position to use them as potent opposition especially to low-level parties.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Slayer's Guide to Troglodytes
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Slayer's Guide to Centaurs
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 03/26/2018 12:21:49

Fascinating and unusual creatures, centaurs - yet although they are well-known members of popular mythology they are rarely encountered when adventuring. Some of that is down to them being reclusive and shy, preoccupied with their own concerns and not really interested in odd bipedal creatures like the average adventurer... but some may be due to DMs and adventure-writers not knowing much about them either, so rarely making use of them. Perhaps this book will make a difference...

Here there is a wealth of information about centaurs from their anatomy and physiology to the way in which they order their societies, indeed everything you might want to know to understand them well enough to present them to good effect in your game as a living, breathing society with which your party can interact. There are ideas for plots involving them, notes on actually playing one - as the DM or as a player choosing one as their player-character - and even a complete centaur settlement to visit... if you can find it and if they'll let you in!

The Centaur Physiology section covers a lot more than just their physiology, although it does describe them physically. They are powerful creatures and always appear in good health, apparently they are very resistant to disease. Some popular misconceptions are debunked. For a start although they are usually described as being part-human part-horse, the humanoid bit is more elf-like as far as the facial features go, although the torso is well-muscled. While they are masters of the woodlands in which they like to dwell, tales of them twisting minds with their magic is far-fetched. They do boast a few druids but most are not, to be honest, smart enough for rigorous study of the arcane.

Their appearance is noted in detail, especially hair colour and distribution. This is vital as they are not given to clothes, although they do like belts and straps to hang equipent or bags upon. Head hair is worn long and loose, although strands may be braided or beaded. They are omnivores, and drink water or goat milk unless they can get hold of elven wine. The discussion moves on to their psychology, which is of particular use if you want to make them come alive as a distinctive race in your game. One thing of note is their almost magical ability to sense any change in their woodland environment, something that only works when they are at home - otherwise their eyesight and hearing is no better than any other humanoid. Normally very peaceful, any attack on an individual centaur or their community is met with vicious retaliation that can be quite shocking to anyone accustomed to their gentle shy manner... including themselves. They detest having to fight, but react instantly when it becomes necessary. The only other time they are not quiet and peaceful is when male centaurs get hold of wine - boy, do they know how to party! Rowdy antics and bawdy songs are the order of the day. Female centaurs won't generally touch a drop.

The next section, Habitat, explains how they prefer deep temperate forests. Given their choice, they'd never emerge. Their villages - they never build settlements larger - exist in harmony with their environment. This is followed by a section on Centaur Society which details their villages at length before discussing that strange beast, the male centaur. They tend to be in a minority, yet are most likely to be encountered by outsiders. As young males get older they get boisterous until it is time for their rite of passage to adulthood, generally around the age of twelve, thereafter they settle down into their roles of a hunter and a protector, defending and supplying their community with food. Females are wiser and generally provide leadership and administration for the community in what is a matriarchal society. Centaur druids usually come from their number, and the leader of a community is usually the most powerful female druid. While there may well be other druids in a community, the others act subordinate to their leader.

After hearing that they pair for life and a little about their simple ceremonies, we move on to the next section Methods of Warfare. While males enjoy physical activity, especially hunting, they do not care to brawl although when moved to do so they are pretty effective. They certainly are not cowards. Preferred weapons are clubs and longbows, both of which are crafted to a very high standard. A 'hit and fade' style of combat is common, thundering in at a charge out of an ambush then wheeling away... to set up another ambush if necessary. In more pitched battles they charge with war lances and shields, a quite terrifying sight.

Next up is a section on Role-playing with Centaurs that is mostly aimed at DMs wishing to use the information provided to make any centaurs the party encounters come to life. As they tend to be good in alignment and interested in things like preserving the environment, there are plenty of opportunities for good-aligned parties to work with centaurs towards a common aim... assuming they can get such skittish creatures to talk! A selection of Scenario Hooks and Ideas are provided to help you set the scene and get the party embroiled with centaurs, even perhaps attending a wedding or helping a stripling male with his rite of passage quest. Or perhaps a sage studying centaurs wants a specimen... that could get messy!

Notes are also provided for those who'd like to play a centaur as their character. It can be quite a challenge to fit a single centaur into a party both mechanically - the racial advantages can unbalance a party - and socially. Can you imagine a centaur even coping with a dungeon delve, let alone enjoying it? There are some ideas here that might make things a bit easier, however.

Finally there's an introduction to the centaur village of Lanhyd. History, everyday life, layout and inhabitants are covered, as well as some ideas for the roles Lanhyd could play in your campaign. Overall it's an excellent introduction to an oft-neglected race. The one thing I'd have liked to have seen is a bit more on their anatomy. How do they actually work? A passing remark in the flavour text suggests they have two hearts, presumably one in the humanoid torso and one where a normal horse would have it; and this is borne out by a sketch of a skeleton that appears to show two rib cages... but how does their respiration and circulation function? Oh dear, you can see they're becoming real in my mind!



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Slayer's Guide to Centaurs
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Slayer's Guide to Hobgoblins
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 03/25/2018 14:02:50

This, the very first book Mongoose Publishing ever produced, set the high standard that they've continued to this day. In it, there's a detailed analysis of all things hobgoblin. Physiology, society, role-playing notes, material on using them as player characters, ideas for adventure and an entire hobgoblin settlement that will no doubt get raided as soon as your party find out where it is!

The Introduction sets out the stall for the entire Slayer's Guide series as well as for this one about hobgoblins. All the goblinoid races have proven popular cannon fodder, they're fairly weak individually but in a horde can provide good cpposition particularly for lower-level parties. However, armed with the deep background on hobgoblins to be found here, they can become formidable foes. Hobgoblins are, after all, quite large as goblinoids go, and they are a martial race who have learned from more 'civilised' races how to organise their fighting forces to good effect.

The Hobgoblin Physiology looks at more than that. There's a description with notes on not just their appearance but physical and sensory capabilities as well. They have excellent hearing, it appears, and can pick out single sounds even in the middle of a brawl. There's some scholarly discussion about their possible origins (although no definite conclusion) and we also find out what they eat, and learn about their life cycle. Female hobgoblins look very similar to male ones (particularly when in armour), but when they are pregnant they stay out of sight. Apparently the race is not given to long-term relationships, so after birth they are soon active again. Youngsters can hold their own by the age of six and are regarded as adult by eleven or twelve. If they don't fall in battle, a hobgoblin can live to sixty, but this is rare.

Their psychology is discussed before moving on to the sort of habitats they prefer - temperate zones with forests and low mountains, although they can be found almost anywhere if they have a good reason to go there. They prefer to settle rather than being nomadic, although they are prepared to move if necessary, and there's a rather interesting discussion about the procedures followed during a migration. Naturally, lairs are designed with an eye to defence. There's copious material on Hobgoblin Society, which is tribal in nature although sometimes a mercenary warband will be encountered. They are led by a tribal chieftain who is the best warrior, and who probably attained his position through combat. The hierarchy is quite structured and tribal customs are followed diligently. When a tribal chieftain dies there's a quite complex ritual to choose a successor which does, of course, involve fighting. A similar formal protocol is followed if another hobgoblin wishes to challenge the chieftain, something that is not done lightly. Most of the tribe's wealth is generated by raiding, and the proceeds are divided up amongst the tribe according to a defined procedure. When not raiding, they prefer to oversee the labours of subjugated lesser races than actually do the work themselves. The tribe at war (with plenty on their strategy and tactics) and mercenary warbands are also discussed. As for religion, most hobgoblins are not very interested!

Next Role-playing with Hobgoblins helps the DM get under the skin of his hobgoblin hordes. For a start, they are not stupid, they are as bright as the average human. As disciplined and efficient warriors they should pose quite a challenge, particularly for parties who are somewhere upon which a tribe has planned and mounted a raid, or if a visit is paid to a tribal lair with hostile intent. There are even some sample hobgoblin names, should conversation rather than swordplay break out.

A section of Scenario Hooks and Ideas provides a wealth of plot ideas for using hobgoblins in your game, and then there's the interesting twist of how to create and play a hobgoblin player character. As a single hobgoblin might have trouble gaining acceptance in a party - and might struggle to fit in even if they'll have him - a hobgoblin-based campaign with the party drawn from a single tribe might be a more viable option. It's likely to be a military-themed campaign, though, perhaps the adventures of a mercenary band.

Finally, an entire lair - the Graven Hill Border Fort - is presented, complete with history (it was captured by its current occupants rather than built by them) and a plan as well as an illustration. It's a bit of an outline, if you like room-by-room descriptions you'll have to put in some preparatory work, but the general layout and defences are provided well.

If there's anything you ever wanted to know about hobgoblins, chances are that you'll find it here.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Slayer's Guide to Hobgoblins
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Reach Adventure 3: The Calixcuel Incident
by Christopher G. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/21/2018 19:21:51

A very nicely written, arranged, and illustrated Traveller adventure. I ran this one over the course of two gaming sessions and the players really enjoyed it. Not only did they get caught up in the drama of the story and the typical array of existential threats that any adventuring group must face, they really liked the fact that the adventure made them feel as if they were making a difference. Here is Chalchiutlicue, a world struggling to deal with a particular issue, and the adventure puts the travellers into a position with which they may directly improve things for the planet and its citizens. We've moved on to other adventures in the Trojan Reach and the players keep talking about their experiences in this adventure and how they hope to go back and help the people of Chalchiutlicue to achieve the lofty heights of the civilization that once dwelled on (and below) its oceanic surface.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Reach Adventure 3: The Calixcuel Incident
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The Pirates of Drinax
by Christopher G. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/21/2018 19:17:31

A really beautiful product and as a Traveller fan since the CT days, this is probably one of the finest products I have seen put out for the game. The books are nicely organized with Book 1 featuring the bulk of the campaign, including 10 adventures that you can conduct in any order you like (minus "Finale," which based on its namesake, you can imagine must come last), Book 2 featuring the Trojan Reach sector and the Aslan, and Book 3 featuring the ships of the Trojan Reach. All three give an aspiring referee all she or he would need to run a really engaging and exciting campaign in which the players get to be what so many have dreamed: space pirates!

The art is mostly of high quality and the tech, animals, starship deck plans, and other supporting materials are both nicely arranged and useful. I haven't run the entire campaign yet, but the players seem to be having a blast so far. I have read all the adventures and they are mostly excellent with a few that stand out head and shoulders above the rest.

I would give this item 4 1/2 stars if I could. The only drawback is a number of typos and inconsistencies that crept through the editing process, though Mongoose did allow the community to provide comments between the initial release of the PDFs and the print copies.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
The Pirates of Drinax
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Reach Adventure 4: Last Flight of the Amuar
by Christopher G. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/21/2018 19:09:10

"Last Flight of the Amuar" was a great adventure to run early in my players' campaign. It introduced them to a large swath of Trojan Reach sector and had them interact with their denizens, getting a sense of how blighted and bereft it is. I highly recommend spicing up the early going of the adventure. The worlds the travellers visit have plenty of potential and the adventure itself suggests that referees might add some content here or there. Once the setting get to the Gollere system and beyond (don't want to spoil too much!), it really heats up. Solving the mystery of a lost 1800-ton merchant ship was one the players readily took on and the final stages of the adventure feature a great deal of suspense. Solving the problems before the group is left open enough that players can exercise their creativity. It doesn't railroad them into one way to get things done.

I highly recommend it, particularly early in a campaign when a group is just starting to learn how to work together. It makes for a nice preamble to a bigger campaign in the Outrim Void and the Trojan Reach at large.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Reach Adventure 4: Last Flight of the Amuar
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Vehicle Handbook
by Customer Name Withheld [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/05/2018 20:05:29

Detailed enough, there is a multi turreted tank, I would have liked an anti grav battleship. Prefer the detail of TNE and Classic Traveller. A good product with many options if you like this system.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Vehicle Handbook
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Supplement 5-6: Vehicle Handbook
by Customer Name Withheld [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/05/2018 20:01:44

I was hoping for stats for a Floating Aircraft carrier or at least a floating destroyer. This current version is just not my cup of tea, but that doesnt mean I am going to slam it. It is a well done product, just not detailed enough for me. I prefer knowing the tank is equipped with a 120L62 cannon rather than a generic heavy auto cannon. The design scheme is quicker, but not necessarily better.



Rating:
[3 of 5 Stars!]
Supplement 5-6: Vehicle Handbook
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Pirates of Drinax: Lions of Thebus
by Christopher G. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 02/23/2018 11:59:40

Nice, brief little adventure that could be used as a lead-in to Drinax or run in the course of the campaign. I like that they invested in a few illustrations for the adventure. Great job characterizing Thebus, a world of otherwise only marginal interest that they've MADE interesting. I will definitely put this one to use.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Pirates of Drinax: Lions of Thebus
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American Vehicles of World War II
by Customer Name Withheld [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 02/13/2018 21:11:08

Some pictures are inaccurate which a novice should have caught. I would appreciate which Traveller system this supplement applies to. But overall quite satisfied with the purchase. Modern supplements for Cold War I would hapoily purchase.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
American Vehicles of World War II
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D66 Compendium 2
by Thilo G. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 02/06/2018 05:17:20

An Endzeitgeist.com review

The second of the massive D66-Compendiums clocks in at 89 pages, 1 page front cover, 1 page editorial, 1 page back cover, leaving us with 86 pages of content, so let’s take a look!

This review was requested as a prioritized review and moved up in my reviewing queue at the request of my patreons.

So, since someone asked: Yes, the presence of this review means that you’ll see more Traveller-reviews in the future! It should be noted that, much like e.g. Raging Swan Press’ dressing books, this massive compilation of d66-tables is almost system neutral. While the book is obviously intended for the Traveller-system, it can easily provide a lot of flavor to pretty much all scifi/space opera games.

We begin this massive compilation with an easy to grasp summary of how to use the book and the d66-tables; the book explains its organization paradigm rather well and begins with tables relevant for character creation. The first d66-table lets you determine the background: If you’re coming from an alien world, for example, you’ll speak multiple languages, are multicultural and more respectful of others. If you hail from a war zone, you’ll be constantly aware of surroundings, are a light sleeper and have seen death up close. You get the idea – pretty neat! The second table provides background events with a bit of crunch thrown in: “Communicated with aliens” means that you enjoyed tinkering with the radio, talking to anyone who listened. This nets you Electronics 0 or Language 0. Such choices can be found in each of the entries – we basically have a bit of crunch and a bit of fluff. Nice!

Particularly helpful in espionage-themed contexts would be the agent events: These may net you bad intel, bombs, have your cover story blown…or net you, for example, a new language, some martial arts training, etc. Interesting would be that these events can also be used by a GM to generate some scenarios: Roll a couple of times and you’ll have some complications to write your yarn around. These are not the only such events we can find in the book, mind you: We also get such an event table for the army, marines, navy, citizens, drifters, merchants, nobles, prisoners, and entertainers, as well as for psions, rogues, scholars and scouts. In short: We get a HUGE amount of handy events that can be easily combined beyond the intended use as a nice generator for adventures – while not intended as such, I personally really liked that this section is versatile enough to allow for such use.

Beyond these profession/organization-type tables, we also get a table on life events that include children as well as a table for main uses of a contact. Nice!

The next section of the pdf deals with crime and the law: Here, we get biometric security devices – which range from the classic to the hilarious. Want an example? “Nose Hair Pattern Algorithm.” This had me laugh so hard and actually inspired me. I mean, what type of alien would make the like? Scent as the primary sense? There is serious potential here. A table of gambling events includes Zero G-jousting. More detailed would be the sample criminal hideouts. Need to reference a famous battle? We get a table of them. “I served at Daumier III” will come to mean something, and to complement this, we get a table of interstellar war names. We also receive a table of military base names and main purposes you can assign to such bases. Speaking of bases: pirate bases names or those for scout bases can be found; we also receive a table of prison facility names and prison nicknames for characters.

Narcotics and recreational drugs are covered in their own table and we get a neat little table of random things that may be unapproved on a given planet, ranging from synthetic tanning chemicals to scuffed shoes and the like.

The book moves on to deal with environments and the complications there: A table of atmosphere taints and another of corrosive, inflammable and “insdeous[sic!]” (should be insidious) atmospheres can be found before we move on to evocative names for deserts and large bodies of water. Names for strange native fruits and weird diseases are next and provide both joys and hardship for explorers. I know I don’t want my character to catch the Zhodani spots… Reasons for planets being dead complement the section with some pretty cool ideas.

After this, we move on to the ship-chapter, which provides sample names for cargo ships, criminal ships, generational ships, medical ships, personal spacecrafts, pirate ships, warships…and we get two different research ship-tables. A table provides different angles for why a ship has crashed.

The next chapter deals with the traveller life, and sports some truly inspiring components: Escalations of a panicked crowd has, for example, an entry that sees 2D-people run towards the problem or another that has a child spontaneously develop telepathy. There are also some rules-relevant components here. A table of mine names and sample pieces of gossip about an authority figure makes for nice pieces of dressing. Names for planetary bureaucracies and spaceport city names are nice…and while you#re at a spaceport, the event-table for the locale should net you enough inspiration to do all kinds of new adventuring. New a reason for an Amber or Red Travel Zone? You can find a full table for each of them here. Need a reason why the PC’s favorite starport’s closed? Another table provides ample justification in that department.

Speaking of which: Know this? Your PCs have cool contacts, but they’d break your plot? Well, a handy table why an ally can’t help you right now provides some nice excuses for the GM. Need a more permanent solution, probably because the PCs botched something? There is a table that notes why the contact was killed. The section also sports a table of medical equipment and local fashion. Weird things stuck in the water refueling also get their own table. There also is a table on shops in spaceports, though I think that one would have made more sense, organization.wise, next to the other spaceport tables.

The concept of pets gets a table for both common and uncommon pets; dog and cat breeds may be found next to bird breeds and the chapter closes with sample names for sports teams.

The Terra System is up next – here, we get a table of American warships and colony names (Bushtopia, Freedom City, Roanoke…); French colony names and warship names are next and we get a table of Chinese warship names (with pronunciation guide) and a table of luna city names, a table of Mars cities and places and one that notes the names of outer system bases and places.

The final chapter handles dressing for the Imprerium, providing a table of names for Aslans (pronounced, one for male and female), one for Darrians (ditto, though we also note the chosen names for each gender in its own table as wella s last names for a total of 6 tables); Droyne get two tables, as do K’Kree and Vargr. The Vilani get three tables and the same holds true for the Zhodani.

Conclusion:

Editing and formatting are very good, I noticed no serious accumulation of problematic entries. Layout adheres to a 1-/2-/3-column standard, depending on the demands of the tables. The pdf has a white background, making it printer-friendly, with small tech-style borders in full-color. The interior artwork ranges from decent to amazing: The chapter-header-illustrations are really impressive and nice. The pdf comes with detailed, nested bookmarks, making orientation rather comfortable. Kudos!

Dale C. McCoy Jr., with additional writing by Albert “GamerDude” Beddow Jr. provides a great compendium of dressing. In contrast to the first such compendium, we get more crunchy options herein without compromising the appeal of the tome beyond the confines of the Traveller-system. The entries remain, as a whole, as brief and concise as possible, but manage to evoke a surprising diversity of themes that should satisfy pretty much any GM out there. The organization of the material deserves special mention: I really enjoyed the sequence of the content, with only precious few tables that, to me, would have made more sense on another page, which also constitutes pretty much my only truly significant gripe with this handy compendium. This book is certain to see some use in scifi-games I run, particularly considering how the massive amount of events basically can be used as an impromptu adventure-structure generator as a nice little bonus. As a whole, I consider this very much worth getting. My final verdict will clock in at 5 stars.

Endzeitgeist out.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
D66 Compendium 2
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Reach Adventure 4: Last Flight of the Amuar
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 01/18/2018 08:39:05

This adventure sends the party into little-known space (at least as far as the Imperium is concerned) in search of a lost commercial vessel. It's designed to take several months of game time, and there's scope for adding in side adventures of your own on the way if you wish. Even their fact-finding inquiries on the places they visit in the course of this adventure may grow into something more should the mood take you and the opportunity arise. This book, though, just covers the core mission of locating the Amur and finding out what happened. Alongside this main theme, the party will have to figure out whether or not their patron is to be trusted...

The adventure begins on Pax Rulin, subsector capital of the Pax Rulin subsector of the Trojan Reach sector, and takes the party through this subsector and the neighbouring Egryn one. This voyage will need a ship capable of Jump-3. If the party has one, fine, but if not their patron can supply one (and will even pay for berthing the party ship while they are away). The Referee's Information chapter provides information on the stellar cartography of the whole region and explains what is to be found there... and perhaps more importantly, who is in charge. There's also a fair bit about their target, the Amuar which is a Leviathan-class ship designed for the sort exploratory commerce in which she was engaged when she disappeared. The facts about her last voyage - which of course the party need to discover - are also laid out. A real chapter of disasters!

Next we meet the vessel that will most likely be used, a Far Trader called the Voidskipper. It has its own little foibles, which can be annoying or endearing depending on how you view them. One thing to note is that its quite cramped, so crews are likely to want to make the most of each planetfall. Encourage the almost claustrophobic feeling and let the freedom of each new world beckon... and there's a neat system to model 'crew fatigue' if you want to make this part of your game mechanics. This affects their performance of their duties as well as making them short-tempered and difficult to live with. This can be reduced by shore leave or even a good dinner, but of course those not able to join in due to their duties actually get worse through resentment! It's a nice idea for when an adventure involves a lot of time in the black.

Background done, the adventure begins. A relative of one of the crew of the Amuar has got hold of a ship and one crewman, but he needs a few more to go in pursuit, so seeks the party's help. He feels that someone must know what happened to her and wants a diversely-skilled bunch to help find out. He offers a wage plus the possibility of big payouts for salvage or information. Apart from that, a few other reasons for wanting to go along are provided should you wish to use them.

The next part provides descriptions of the places they call at, and events that might take place there including a brief collection of suggestions for further adventures if you wish to prolong the stay. There are also opportunites to gather information about the Amuar and by the fifth system visited the party should be building up quite a good picture of the ship and have an idea where she ended up... if they don't find all the clues they need, they may end up visiting even more worlds, and a good assortment are given brief descriptions should they stop there - although you will have to flesh these out considerably more than the first five planets.

Finally (hopefully) the party will arrive in the system where the Amuar is, and can then investigate what took place aboard. The locals are unfriendly and insular, but it should not prove too difficult to find the Amuar... and then the party will have to explore her to discover what happened. That's where the adventure ends. You'll have to attend to getting them back home yourself. As well as main NPCs, some new weapons and equipment and yet another ship (encountered on the way) are detailed at the back.

It makes for an interesting yet rather bland adventure which leaves quite a lot to the referee, although inventive ones can make it come alive. A lot of the time it reads more like an adventure outline rather than a full-blown adventure: expect that and you'll find it quite well resourced.



Rating:
[4 of 5 Stars!]
Reach Adventure 4: Last Flight of the Amuar
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Reach Adventure 3: The Calixcuel Incident
by Megan R. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 01/17/2018 13:03:40

This adventure is set on Chalchiutlicue in the Sindal subsector, but could work fine on any planet with substantual amounts of ocean. Basically a visit to the underwater city of Calixcuel does not go quite to plan, the party gets caught up in a series of deadly events and have the opportunity to save the day. Whilst they might be there in the first place for reasons of their own, a good one is supplied to get them there. It's a fairly open adventure with a lot left to the Referee to develop either in advance or as the adventure proceeds, depending on your style of play.

As background, there's a fair bit of information about living and working underwater, Traveller-style. This includes a discussion of pressure at depth - I'm a SCUBA diver so it's pretty straightforward, but if you aren't familiar with the concepts the explanation is clear enough for gaming purposes. Suffice to say that spaceships and vac suits are designed to keep standard atmospheres IN, not the vastly increased pressure of deep water OUT. There's also background on the Sindal subsector and Chalchiutlicue in particular. It's a water world, and not a very rich one. Most people are more interested in survival than much else, and the world is seriously overcrowded.

The adventure begins with the party in the planet's Downport (a plan for which is provided). Here, they are invited to meet with a government official who has a job proposition - they need someone good with starship powerplants to sort out a second-hand starship reactor that they've acquired and want to use to power an undersea city. From there, they travel to Calixcuel on a submarine to do the job, a trip that takes about eight days. Why they are even on Chalchiutlicue at all is left to you, however.

Once they reach Calixcuel they are greeted with a reception and a guided tour. An overall diagram, but no detailed plans, of the underwater city are provided. It's basically a tall spike resting on the ocean floor. Scarcely have they settled into their quarters, however, than disaster strikes. As 'visiting experts' their assistance will be welcome, of course... and from here on in it is very much up to the party to decide what, if anything, they can do. There are suggestions and descriptions of various parts of the city to help you respond to their choices - read them thoroughly in advance and be ready to go with the flow.

All is very open-ended, the party may choose to attempt to escape or there is a chance that, with the right choices, they'll be able to save the entire city. It makes for a 'disaster movie' sort of adventure and ought to be played that way. It's an episode that will be remembered for a long time to come...



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Reach Adventure 3: The Calixcuel Incident
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